U-M approves new graduate certificate in computational neuroscience

By | Educational, General Interest, Happenings, News

The new Graduate Certificate in Computational Neuroscience will help bridge the gap between experimentally focused studies and quantitative modeling and analysis, giving graduate students a chance to broaden their skill sets in the diversifying field of brain science.

“The broad, practical training provided in this certificate program will help prepare both quantitatively focused and lab-based students for the increasingly cross-disciplinary job market in neuroscience,” said Victoria Booth, Professor of Mathematics and Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, who will oversee the program.

To earn the certificate, students will be required to take core computational neuroscience courses and cross-disciplinary courses outside of their home departments; participate in a specialized interdisciplinary journal club; and complete a practicum.

Cross-discplinary courses will depend on a student’s focus: students in experimental neuroscience programs will take quantitative coursework, and students in quantitative science programs such as physics, biophysics, mathematics and engineering will take neuroscience coursework.

The certificate was approved this fall, and will be jointly administered by the Neuroscience Graduate Program (NGP) and the Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE).

For more information, visit micde.umich.edu/comput-neuro-certificate. Enrollment is not yet open, but information sessions will be scheduled early next year. Please register for the program’s mailing list if you’re interested.

Along with the Graduate Certificate in Computational Neuroscience, U-M offers several other graduate programs aimed at training students in computational and data-intensive science, including:

  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering, which is focused on quantitative and computing techniques that can be applied broadly to all sciences.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Data Science, which specializes in statistical and computational methods required to analyze large data sets.
  • The Ph.D in Scientific Computing, intended for students who will make extensive use of large-scale computation, computational methods, or algorithms for advanced computer architectures in their doctoral studies. This degree is awarded jointly with an existing program, so that a student receives, for example, a Ph.D in Aerospace engineering and Scientific Computing.

 

Graduate programs in computational and data science — informational sessions Sept. 19 & 21

By | Educational, Events, News

Students interested in computational and data science are invited to learn about graduate programs that will prepare them for success in computationally intensive fields. Pizza and pop will be provided.

Two sessions are scheduled:

Monday, Sept. 19, 5 – 6 p.m.
Johnson Rooms, Lurie Engineering Center (North Campus)

Wednesday, Sept. 21, 5 – 6 p.m.
2001 LSA Building (Central Campus)

The sessions will address:

  • The Ph.D. in Scientific Computing, which is open to all Ph.D. students who will make extensive use of large-scale computation, computational methods, or algorithms for advanced computer architectures in their studies. It is a joint degree program, with students earning a Ph.D. from their current departments, “… and Scientific Computing” — for example, “Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering and Scientific Computing.”
  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering, which trains graduate students in computationally intensive research so they can excel in interdisciplinary HPC-focused research and product development environments. The certificate is open to all students currently pursuing Master’s or Ph.D. degrees at the University of Michigan. This year we will offer a new practicum option through the Multidisciplinary Design Program.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Data Science, which is focused on developing core proficiencies in data analytics:
    1) Modeling — Understanding of core data science principles, assumptions and applications;
    2) Technology — Knowledge of basic protocols for data management, processing, computation, information extraction, and visualization;
    3) Practice — Hands-on experience with real data, modeling tools, and technology resources.