Save the Date: MICDE Symposium, April 7

The Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE) Annual Symposium will take place April 7 in the Rackham Building on U-M’s Central Campus.

Titled “Towards Tomorrow’s Computational Science,” the symposium will feature an outstanding group of speakers, including the director of NSF’s Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure, Irene Qualters; 2016 SIAM awardee Linda Petzold (UCSB); AMS/SIAM Norbert Wiener Prize winner James Sethian (Berkeley); and MathWorks co-founder and Matlab author Cleve Moler.

The symposium will also include a poster session highlighting outstanding computational work from U-M researchers and students. To participate in the poster session, contact Mariana Carrasco-Teja.

More information, including a detailed agenda, will be posted on the MICDE website as it becomes available.

NSF seeks proposals for allocation on Blue Waters petascale computing system — April 4 deadline

The National Science Foundation is soliciting proposals for allocations on the Blue Waters computing system at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Successful proposals will receive Blue Waters allocations and limited travel funds.

Visit the Petascale Computing Resource Allocations (PRAC) site for for full details.

Proposals must be submitted through NSF’s FastLane system.

XSEDE16 conference call for participation — April deadlines

XSEDE16, the 5th annual conference of the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment, will take place July 17-21, 2016 in Miami. The conference will showcase the work of researchers who use XSEDE resources and services, as well as other digital resources and services throughout the world. The theme is “DIVERSITY, BIG DATA, AND SCIENCE AT SCALE: Enabling the Next Generation of Science and Technology.”

The Technical Program includes the following tracks: Accelerating Discovery in Scholarly Research; Advanced Cyberinfrastructure Technology; Software and Software Environments; Visualization Best Practices; Posters; Tutorials; and Birds of a Feather (BOFs). Additional opportunities are also available for student-led work by high-schoolers, undergraduates, and graduate students.

Submissions are now being accepted for tutorials and technical papers:

April 1: Tutorial submission deadline

April 15: Technical papers abstract deadline

April 22: Technical papers submission deadline.

Visit the conference site for more information.

Info Sessions: Graduate programs in computational and data science — Feb. 22, 23

Learn about graduate programs that will prepare you for success in computationally intensive fields, and enjoy some pizza. Presentations will describe the following programs:

  • The Ph.D. in Scientific Computing is open to all Ph.D. students who will make extensive use of large-scale computation, computational methods, or algorithms for advanced computer architectures in their studies. It is a joint degree program, with students earning a Ph.D. from their current departments, “… and Scientific Computing” — for example, “Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering and Scientific Computing.”
  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering trains graduate students in computationally intensive research so they can excel in interdisciplinary HPC-focused research and product development environments. The certificate is open to all students currently pursuing Master’s or Ph.D. degrees at the University of Michigan.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Data Science is focused on developing core proficiencies in data analytics: 1) Modeling — Understanding of core data science principles, assumptions and applications; 2) Technology — Knowledge of basic protocols for data management, processing, computation, information extraction, and visualization; 3) Practice — Hands-on experience with real data, modeling tools, and technology resources.

Monday, February 22, 5-6 p.m., Room 2001, LS&A Building, 500 State St. 

Tuesday, February 23, 5-6 p.m., EECS 1200, 1301 Beal Ave. 

Presenters:

  • Krishna Garikipati, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics, and Associate Director for Research, Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering.
  • Ivo Dinov, Associate Professor of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, and Human Behavior and Biological Sciences.

There will be time for questions and discussion.

REMINDER: Info Sessions: Graduate programs in computational and data science — Feb. 22, 23

Learn about graduate programs that will prepare you for success in computationally intensive fields, and enjoy some pizza. Presentations will describe the following programs:

  • The Ph.D. in Scientific Computing is open to all Ph.D. students who will make extensive use of large-scale computation, computational methods, or algorithms for advanced computer architectures in their studies. It is a joint degree program, with students earning a Ph.D. from their current departments, “… and Scientific Computing” — for example, “Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering and Scientific Computing.”
  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering trains graduate students in computationally intensive research so they can excel in interdisciplinary HPC-focused research and product development environments. The certificate is open to all students currently pursuing Master’s or Ph.D. degrees at the University of Michigan.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Data Science is focused on developing core proficiencies in data analytics: 1) Modeling — Understanding of core data science principles, assumptions and applications; 2) Technology — Knowledge of basic protocols for data management, processing, computation, information extraction, and visualization; 3) Practice — Hands-on experience with real data, modeling tools, and technology resources.

Monday, February 22, 5-6 p.m., Room 2001, LS&A Building, 500 State St. 

Tuesday, February 23, 5-6 p.m., EECS 1200, 1301 Beal Ave. 

Presenters:

  • Krishna Garikipati, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics, and Associate Director for Research, Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering.
  • Ivo Dinov, Associate Professor of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, and Human Behavior and Biological Sciences.

There will be time for questions and discussion.

Hadoop Workshop — Feb. 17

Registration is now open for a Hadoop Workshop offered by ARC-TS.

Time/Date: 2 – 5 p.m., Wednesday, February 17, 2016

Location: Room B250, East Hall, 530 Church Street

Instructor: Brock Palen, Advanced Research Computing – Technology Services

Overview: Learn how to process large amounts (up to terabytes) of data using SQL and/or simple programming models available in Python, Scala, and Java. Computers will be provided to follow along with hands-on examples; users can also bring laptops.

More information and registration: arc-ts.umich.edu/hadoop-workshop

Space is limited, so sign up as soon as possible to reserve your spot.

CSCAR Data Science Skills Series adds session on Pandas case studies — Feb. 17

CSCAR is offering a series of workshops on data science skills using Python. The workshops will be held in the Earl Lewis room in the Rackham building. All workshops will take place on Wednesday afternoons from 3:30-5.

No registration is necessary and there is no fee to attend. Please note: A new section has been added on Pandas case studies.

Schedule:

  • January 27: Data management with Pandas
  • February 10: Graphics and data visualization with Matplotlib and Bokeh
  • NEW: February 17: Pandas case studies (CMS data analyses)
  • February 24: Basic statistical analysis with Statsmodels
  • March 9: Sklearn for predictive analysis and data exploration
  • March 23: Advanced regression analysis (GEE, mixed models and multiple imputation) with Statsmodels
  • April 6: Survival analysis with Statsmodels

Additional workshops will be scheduled on the following topics, dates to be announced:

  • Geospatial analysis
  • Building and accessing databases
  • MPI, parallel, and distributed computing

Class material will be posted on the series website.

SC16 conference seeking workshop proposals — Feb. 7 deadline

The SC16 supercomputing conference in Salt Lake City in November is taking proposals for full- and half-day workshops. The conference will include nearly 30 workshops. Proposals will be peer-reviewed with a focus on submissions that will inspire dialogue in topics of interest to the HPC community, according to an SC16 notice. Workshops are meant to complement the overall Technical Program events, expand the knowledge base of its subject area, and extend its impact by providing greater depth of focus.

Proposals must be submitted at: https://submissions.supercomputing.org/. The deadline is Feb. 7, 2016.

More information: http://sc16.supercomputing.org/submitters/workshops/
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ): http://sc16.supercomputing.org/submitters/workshops/workshops-faq/
Email Contact: workshops@info.supercomputing.org

Scientific Computing Student Club launch event — Feb. 5

The Scientific Computing Student Club (SC2) is a new organization at the University of Michigan sponsored by the Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE). Its membership includes students and postdocs from many disciplines and interests.

Its goals are to:

  • Develop a community across disciplines that fosters collaboration and peer support for scientific computing
  • Promote the best practices and standards relating to scientific computing
  • Teach and learn about computing resources, languages and environments available at the University of Michigan and at major computing resources
  • Aid in the creation and sharing of open-source projects
  • Provide a forum for the sharing of the computational triumphs of members research as well as potentially helpful developments and information learned along the way

Please join the club for a kick-off event.

Time/Date: 4:30 p.m., Friday, February 5.

Location: Arbor Brewing Company, 114 E. Washington. (Tap Room)

Food will be provided. The College of Engineering Office of Graduate Studies is a co-sponsor of this event.

MICDE Seminar: Jim Belak, Lawrence Livermore National Lab, “Bridging Scales within Exascale Materials Co-design Center” — Feb. 5

As part of the MICDE Seminar Series, Jim Belak of the Materials Science Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will speak on campus Friday, Feb. 5.

Abstract: The advent of Advanced / Additive Manufacturing and the Materials Genome Initiative has placed significant emphasis on accelerating the qualification of new materials for use in real applications. Within these workflows lies both the engineering scale qualification through building and testing components at scale and full-scale modeling with integrated continuum computer codes and the materials scale qualification through revolutionary methods to non-destructively measure microstructure (3DXRD) and physics specific experiments coupled with meso-scale mechanics simulations of the same physics specific experiment using the same microstructure. This ICME process is one of the use cases that drives the Exascale Materials Co-design Center (ExMatEx). The goal of the Co-design Center is very analogous to the acceleration of new materials deployment within the MGI, rather co-design accelerates the deploying of laboratory concepts for future computer components to enable a productive exascale computer system. To enable better meso-scale understanding in the continuum models, ExMatEx is creating a direct coupling between the continuum integrated code and direct numerical simulation of the meso-scale phenomena. Here we review the ExMatEx project, and its use cases.

Bio: Jim Belak is an Applied Scientist in the Materials Science Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. His career has centered around the application of High Performance Computing to equilibrium and non-equilibrium problems in Condensed Matter Physics, including: order-disorder phase transition in solids; indentation, metal cutting and tribology of interfaces; shock propagation and spallation fracture; structure and dynamics of grain boundaries and defects in solids; and kinetics of phase evolution in extreme environments. These applications have required the development of new algorithms and application codes for emerging high performance parallel computers and the use of novel x-ray synchrotron techniques (3D x-ray tomography and small-angle x-ray scattering) to guide and validate the simulations. Currently, Jim co-leads the Exascale Co-design Center for Materials in Extreme Environments (ExMatEx).